satr9:

New Hampshire moths are practically sparrows. Two Luna moths, and a Polyphemus moth

9,881 notes

justin-bernardo:

It’s depressing seeing how many people give up on their dreams at a young age because they’re told to “be realistic”.

67,259 notes

samwolfeconnelly:

'Inhumed'
graphite/charcoal/pearlescent acrylic
Sam Wolfe Connelly

samwolfeconnelly:

'Inhumed'

graphite/charcoal/pearlescent acrylic

Sam Wolfe Connelly

269 notes

I want this to be me

(Source: fyeahmovieclub)

73,437 notes

kunstzooi:

Brother & Sister (Egon & Gerti Schiele c.1910) 

143 notes

rachelisaflameprincess:

bendydicks:

considerthishippie:

Instead of just looking up into the sky, you’re actually gazing down into the infinite cosmic abyss, with only gravity holding you onto the surface of the earth.

oh

i was not prepared for that

336,074 notes

txchnologist:

Flow Masters

by Michael Keller

Over the last decade, materials scientists have been trying really hard to keep from getting wet. To that end, they’ve made huge strides developing coatings that so thoroughly repel dirt and water, they seem almost magic. Their secret? Recreating the nanoscale structures that some organisms employ to stay clean and dry and to redirect liquid flow. 

Among researchers’ muses from the natural world are the stenocara beetle, lotus and nasturtium leaves, and the wings of butterflies. The National Science Foundation has compiled some compelling visual examples of natural and synthesized superhydrophobic surfaces. See the full video below. 

Read More

1,312 notes